Suicide in Farmers

The suicide rate in farmers surpasses that of any other industry, according to a new study from the University of Iowa.

“Occupational factors such as poor access to quality health care, isolation, and financial stress interact with life factors to continue to place farmers at a disproportionately high risk for suicide,” stated study co-author Corinne Peek-Asa, professor of occupational and environmental health in the UI College of Public Health

The stigma around farming deters farmers struggling with mental health issues to seek help.  Farmers also have access to large equipment and means to carry out suicide.  Because farming is more a lifestyle than an occupation, farmers believe that when their farm starts to deteriorate, they have to reason to continue.
Getting help for depression, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts should not be frowned upon by society.  If farmers and ranchers begin to utilize the same determination and perseverance they put into their farms, into mental health, we could change these statistics.  Farmers and ranchers have been the foundation of our country, and their job is important.
If you are struggling with depression or suicidal thoughts
  • 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or TTY 1-800-799-4TTY (4889)
  • Red Nacional de Prevencion del Suicidio 1-888-628-9454
  • Veterans Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and press 1

Find mental health services in your area by visiting Texas Mental Health Services Search

Read the full article on suicide in farmers from Morning Ag Clips here.

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